News

Safety Tips - Stop Ticks

June 20, 2017

The tick population is experiencing a surge this spring - those who work outdoors in the northeast are at a high risk! 

 The CDC recommends doing the following before going outdoors: 

  • Know where to expect ticks. Ticks live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas. You may come into contact with ticks during outdoor activities around your home or when walking through leaf litter or near shrubs. 

  • Products containing permethrin kill ticks. Permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing and camping gear and remain protective through several washings.

  • Use a repellent with DEET on skin. Repellents containing 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding the hands, eyes, and mouth. 

After You Come Indoors: 

  • Check your clothing for ticks. Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed. If the clothes require washing first, hot water is recommended.

  • Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.

  • Check your body for ticks after being outdoors. Conduct a full body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas. Be sure to check:

    • Under the arms

    • In and around the ears

    • Inside belly button

    • Back of the knees

    • In and around the hair

    • Between the legs

    • Around the waist

What To Do If You Find An Attached Tick:

 

Remove the attached tick as soon as you notice it by grasping with tweezers, as close to the skin as possible, and pulling it straight out. For detailed information about tick removal, see the tick removal page.

 

Watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever in the days and weeks following the bite, and see a health care provider if these develop. Your risk of acquiring a tick-borne illness depends on many factors, including where you live, what type of tick bit you, and how long the tick was attached. If you become ill after a tick bite, see a health care provider.

 

Prevent Ticks On Animals:

 

Use tick control products to prevent family pets from bringing ticks into the home. Tick collars, sprays, shampoos, or "top spot" medications should be used regularly to protect your animals and your family from ticks. Consult your veterinarian and be sure to use these products according to the package instructions. 

 

See the CDC page for full information. 

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